Wed, 11 Dec 2019

Egyptian authorities on Monday opened up Tora prison in Cairo for a media tour, following a UN report on the "brutal" conditions in which jailed ex-president Mohammed Morsi was held before his death.

In a rare tour of the sprawling jail complex, journalists were shown an exhibition of furniture made by inmates, a farm with cows and ostriches, and a brief football match between prisoners.

The guided tour comes ahead of a mission to Geneva by Egyptian officials for a review on Wednesday before the United Nations Human Rights Council.

It was arranged in response to a stinging review last week by an independent panel of UN experts that blasted conditions in Tora.

The experts said the death of ousted Islamist president Morsi, who was held in Tora for five years, could amount to a "state-sanctioned arbitrary killing".

The former president died in June after collapsing in a Cairo courtroom while on trial.

"Morsi was held in conditions that can only be described as brutal, particularly during his five-year detention in the Tora prison complex," the experts said in a statement.

His death "after enduring those conditions could amount to a state-sanctioned arbitrary killing", the experts added. They also warned that thousands are at risk of death in the same prison.

On the media tour, abuse charges in Tora were dismissed by politicians and personalities that included for example retired ex-national football goalkeeper turned television pundit Ahmed Shobeir.

"This prison is more of a seaside resort now compared to what it used to be," Mostafa Bakry, a pro-Sisi parliamentarian, contended.

He told AFP that inmates were treated with dignity, pointing to a newly-mowed football pitch.

On documented allegations of abuse, Bakry said these were foreign-originated charges designed to sow chaos, echoing the common response of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

The former head of the army turned president led the military's ouster of Morsi in 2013.

"Inmates are not sitting in their cells. They can play soccer or exercise and there are a lot of activities for them," said Alaa Abed, a former policeman and current head of parliament's human rights committee.

Other senior officials declined to speak on the record during the tour, while AFP was prevented from talking directly with inmates.

The family of prominent human rights lawyer Mohamed el-Baqer, who was detained in September, said on social media they were prevented from seeing him Monday because of the media tour.

Rights groups have regularly accused Egyptian authorities of severe violations including torture, overcrowding and medical negligence in jails.

At least 4 000 people, including lawyers, activists, professors and journalists, were detained in a wave of arrests following rare anti-Sisi protests in September, according to local rights groups.

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